Monday, March 3, 1997

The Daily Gazette

Swarthmore College
Monday, March 3, 1997
Volume 1, Number 28

NEWS IN BRIEF

1) Board approves 4.5 percent tuition hike

2) Five professors granted tenure; seven more receive promotions

3) Student Council discusses Mertz mud, Tarble food and smoke

SPORTS IN BRIEF

1)  The weekend’s results

2)  Hoop dreams remain unfulfilled

3)  Track and field: three qualify for nationals, 4×400 breaks school record

4)  Tonight’s and the week’s contests

NEWS REPORT

1) Board approves 4.5 percent tuition hike

Tuition, room and board will rise 4.5 percent under next year’s College
budget, which the Board of Managers approved Saturday, said President Al
Bloom. The budget assumes inflation of 3 percent, so students will face a
real increase of about 1.5 percent in the cost of attending Swarthmore.

Bloom said next year’s tuition charge will be $21,792, up from $20,846 this
year. A space in College housing will cost $3,854, up from $3,688, and
board will cost $3646, up from $3,488. Only the student activities fee,
which is set by Student Council, will remain unchanged, at $208.

For students living on campus, College charges will total $29,500 next
year. This year the total is $28,230.

Many students won’t have to pay the full increase because financial aid
spending will also increase, Bloom noted.

But students on financial aid will be expected to earn more next year.
Incoming first-year students on financial aid will be expected to earn
$1340 each over the summer, while rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors
on financial aid will be expected to earn $1750 each over the summer, Bloom
said. In addition, all students on aid will be expected to earn $1300
during the school year.

The summer work expectation for upperclassmen reflects an increase of
roughly 3 percent over this year’s $1700 expectation. The hike, which
follows a controversial $100 increase last year, is meant to keep work
expectations in line with inflation, said Student Council co-chair Sean
Barney ’98, who sits on the College Budget Committee.

Bloom said the Board spent much of Saturday’s meeting discussing whether to
spend more money from the endowment to pay for financial aid after next
year. He said the administration and Board are committed to meeting
students’ full financial need in the future; the only question is how to
pay for it.

*****

2) Five professors granted tenure; seven more receive promotions

Five professors were granted tenure at the Board of Managers’ meeting
Saturday, said Provost Jennie Keith.

The following assistant professors received tenure and were promoted to the
rank of associate professor: Thomas Hunter, of the mathematics department;
Robert Paley, of the chemistry department; and Micheline Rice-Maximin, of
the French department.

Brigitte Lane, associate professor of French, and Richard Valelly,
associate professor of political science, were also granted tenure. Since
they already hold the rank of associate professor, they were not promoted.

Keith declined to say how many professors were denied tenure. She said that
over the last 20 years, about 80 percent of professors in tenure-track
positions here have been granted tenure. “We try very hard to hire people
who will get tenure. That’s our wish,” she said.

Keith said the Board also promoted seven associate professors to the rank
of full professor this weekend.

The professors who received promotions are: Nathalie Anderson, of the
English literature department; Joy Charlton, of the sociology and
anthropology department; Sharon Friedler, of the dance department; Frank
Moscatelli, of the physics department; Michael Mullan, of the physical
education department; Faruq Siddiqui, of the engineering department; and
Robin Wagner-Pacifici, of the sociology and anthropology department.

*****

3) Student Council discusses Mertz mud, Tarble food and smoke

Little can be done to clean up the mud on Mertz Lawn unless the ultimate
frisbee teams stop practicing there in wet weather, Student Council member
Josh Alloy ’98 told SC Sunday night. Alloy explained that the teams don’t
cancel practice when it rains, so whenever the field is wet frisbee players
tear it up. “The frisbee team should show some restraint and some common
sense,” he said.

Tim Sibley ’98, who captained the men’s ultimate team last fall, said in an
interview that the team understands why Mertz residents dislike the mud,
but has nowhere else to practice. “That field is not ideal for us, either,”
he said. “We don’t enjoy playing in the mud. But the people in the
fieldhouse have been unwilling to let us play on any of the other fields on
campus.”

Canceling practice when it rains isn’t an option, Sibley added. “It rains
pretty often, and we feel like we need to practice,” he said.

Alloy said Larry Schall, Swarthmore’s associate vice president for
facilities and services, will discuss the issue with the athletic
department. Possible solutions include installing lights on DuPont field,
which the rugby teams currently use, so the ultimate frisbee teams can
practice there at night, Alloy said.

Council also moved ahead Sunday night with numerous other initiatives,
including a plan to survey students on food quality and smoking in the
lounge and snack bar in Tarble-in-Clothier.

In other business, SC member-at-large and secretary Chris Seaman ’99
announced he will not resign from Council. Seaman said February 16 he was
thinking of resigning because he felt he was too busy to do his job well.
But he promised Sunday to fulfill his responsibilities, and said Council
should impeach him if he fails to do so.

*****

SPORTS UPDATE

1)  The weekend’s results

MEN’S ULTIMATE
Swarthmore 11, University of Maryland 3
Swarthmore 13, SUNY Binghamton 3
Columbia 13, Swarthmore 6
Swarthmore 13, Carnegie Mellon 2
The Swarming Earthworms kicked off the spring season with a 3-1 record in
the Lehigh tourney Saturday.

WOMEN’S RUGBY
Swarthmore 7, University of Pennsylvania 5
In the first game of the season, Swarthmore jumped out to an early lead
with a try by scrum-half Jennifer Philpott ’97. Fullback Meghan Brennan ’00
converted the kick to give the team a 7-0 lead. UPenn scored later in the
half but missed on the kick. The B-side lost 5-0.

*****

2)  Hoop dreams remain unfulfilled

The Swarthmore College men’s basketball team had its dreams of earning an
automatic bid to the NCAA Division III national tournament cut painfully
short Saturday night. The Red Devils of Dickinson College handed the Garnet
a 90-59 loss at the Tarble Pavilion in the finals of the Centennial
Conference tournament. Dickinson will be the only team representing the
conference in the national tournament.

Swarthmore could not duplicate its impressive 64-63 win on February 15 over
Dickinson. The team mustered only 18 points in the first half, 11 by center
Aaron Bond ’97, who finished the game with 20 points and 14 rebounds. Hot
shooting (74.2 percent) by the Red Devils in the second half stymied all
comeback attempts by the Garnet. The loss will most likely bring an end to
a great season for Swarthmore basketball and to the contributions of the
team’s five seniors.

*****

3)  Track and field: three qualify for nationals, 4×400 breaks school record

Track and field competed against Division III schools from North Carolina
to Maine this Saturday in the Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference indoor
track and field championship at Boston University. Swarthmore athletes used
the meet as a chance to qualify for the national championships. Desiree
Peterkin ’00 jumped a slightly better provisional qualifying mark in the
triple jump than she did in last week’s conference meet, improving to 36′
3″. Both Danielle Duffy ’98 in the open 400m and Liam O’Neill ’00 in the
1500m run edged under the provisional marks in their races, running 59.93
and 3:57.79, respectively.

While they did not qualify for nationals, the men’s 4x400m relay team of
Mason Tootell ’99, Amber Thompson ’97, O’Neill and Eric Pakurar ’97 ran the
fastest race in the history of Swarthmore indoor track, setting the record
at 3:25.6.  The women’s 4x400m relay of Catherine Laine ’98, Stephanie
Herring ’99, Duffy, and Jill Wildonger ’97 ran 4:08.1, a full four seconds
faster than the time with which they won the conference title one week
earlier. The men’s distance medley relay placed fifth overall with a time
of 10:46.

*****

4)  Tonight’s and the week’s contests

No contests are scheduled for this week.

Look in The Daily Gazette the rest of this week for a preview of varsity
sports teams for the upcoming spring season.
Tuesday: GOLF, TRACK AND FIELD
Wednesday: BASEBALL, SOFTBALL
Thursday: LACROSSE
Friday: TENNIS

*****

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The Daily Gazette
Board of Editors
Fred Bush
Kate Doty
Jennifer Klein
David Lischer
Eric Pakurar
Sam Schulhofer-Wohl
Sylvia Weedman

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This concludes today’s report.

Copyright 1997 by The Daily Gazette.  All rights reserved.